Stop invasive species before they spread

Dog-strangling vine

Dog-strangling vine forms a dense blanket of spindly vines which can harm young trees and prevent recreational enjoyment of your property.

Join us for an interactive scavenger hunt to discover if you have invasive species on your property. Learn about programs and funding to help you stop them before they become costly to control.

Nature Invaders Scavenger Hunt

Saturday, May 15 – Saturday, May 22

Learn more about invasive species and what you can do to stop them from spreading on your property. Participation is easy and requires no previous knowledge of invasive species. We’ll be using the iNaturalist app, an easy-to-use citizen science app that helps you identify plants from photographs you take with your phone.

We’ll share resources and tips on identifying and managing invasive species through our iNaturalist project, where you’ll also be able to engage with CVC’s stewardship and invasive species experts to discuss your findings.

Why participate?

Invasive species are aggressive, non-native plants that can reduce the natural beauty and recreational enjoyment of your property and your community. Removing an infestation is costly. Catching problem plants early can help you prevent them from spreading.

Who should participate?

Rural landowners in the Credit River Watershed with properties of one acre or more are invited to participate. While we encourage everyone to use iNaturalist to discover the plants on their properties, this program is specifically for landowners who meet the eligibility criteria.

How to participate?

First, register for the event to let us know you plan to participate. Download the iNaturalist app from the App Store or Google Play Store. Create an account and join our Nature Invaders project to get started. 

Learn more at our Nature Invaders Scavenger Hunt website.

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