Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 – “Terror Cotta Haunted Forest” returns to Terra Cotta Conservation Area on Friday and Saturday, Oct. 26 and 27, from 6 to 9 p.m. with plenty of spook-tacular fun for the family.

The event is designed for children 12 and under and all children must be accompanied by an adult to be admitted. Little ghouls and goblins can take part in a mysterious spirit walk presented by “To Be Determined Theatre Company”, haunted wagon rides, a spooky maze, campfire tales and interactive haunted stations with “Georgetown Little Theatre”.

A limited number of tickets are available for each evening to ensure children have enough time to enjoy all the spook-tacular Halloween activities. Gates and barbecue open at 5 p.m. and events run from 6 to 9 p.m. Participants are encouraged to wear costumes and have their picture taken at the photo booth for a small fee.

Admission is $7 for adults and $5 for children six to 12. Children under six are admitted for free. Admission for seniors 60 and older is $5. Tickets must be purchased in advance and visitors should be prepared for the weather since the event runs rain or shine.

For more information call 1-800-367-0890 or visit www.creditvalleyca.ca/hauntedforest. Terra Cotta is located at 14452 Winston Churchill Blvd., north of the Village of Terra Cotta.

-30-

Conservation Authorities are a provincial/municipal partnership. CVC was established by an act of the province in 1954 with a mandate to protect all natural resources other than minerals in the area drained by the Credit River. We have been working for more than 50 years with our partner municipalities and stakeholders to protect and enhance the natural environment of the Credit River Watershed for present and future generations.

MEDIA CONTACTS: 
Marta MarychukJulie McManus
Corporate Communications CA Partnership Coordinator
Credit Valley ConservationCredit Valley Conservation
905-670-1615, ext. 224  905-670-1615, ext. 247
[email protected]   [email protected]   

                                  Credit Valley Conservation

Scroll to Top